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Divorce Archives

Decline in divorce rate should not be viewed as good or bad

Many statistics are available in Oregon and throughout the country. When viewing data, there is a tendency to define a positive and negative direction of the trends. For example, unemployment numbers going down would be positive, whereas an increase in crime would be viewed as negative. However, experts are recommending that one particular statistic should not be viewed this way. They suggest that changes in the national divorce rate – either up or down – should not be considered good or bad.

Divorce rates down across the country

People often make the statement that half of all marriages in this country will end. However, a recent study by the National Center for Family and Marriage Research shows that the divorce rate has steadily declined in the last four decades. In fact, when studying marriages in Oregon and across the country, research shows that those rates are at their lowest in quite some time.

Seasonal spike in divorce filings follows holiday periods

Most Oregon families relish the holiday seasons and look forward to time spent in the company of their loved ones. For those unhappy in their marriage, however, holidays are stressful and emotional times filled with doubts and contemplation. It may come as no surprise, then, that January is sometimes referred to as "Divorce Month" by professionals who deal with crumbling marriages.

Researchers point to full-time employment as factor in divorce

Most couples in Oregon have their own opinions about what factors are most likely to ultimately lead to the breakdown of a marriage. Money problems are commonly believed to be a strong influencer of divorce, as are extramarital affairs and wives' ability to go financially support themselves after a split. However, researchers claim that how a couple divides up unpaid and paid labor can create a much higher risk.

Divorce doesn't have to hurt your wallet

One of the biggest concerns people have when filing for divorce is their future financial status. From splitting up debt to taking on the financial responsibility for a home, there are many opportunities for individuals to falter. While Oregon couples filing for a divorce do not need to be worried about the actual process of divorce affecting their credit score, they should be aware of how decisions made during property division can potentially have a negative effect.

Don't let these myths influence your divorce decision

TV shows and movies have not exactly done an excellent job of accurately depicting family law issues. This results in many people in Oregon having distorted ideas of what will happen once they actually file for divorce. In some instances, people even put off ending a bad marriage because they believe certain untruths.

Staying out of court can help finances after a divorce

Ending a marriage can be an emotional prospect for Oregon couples. Contrary to popular belief, though, emotions should not be running the show. Foresight matters when it comes to many different matters in life, including divorce. Giving careful consideration to the future and the actual divorce process can help both parties come away with a secure financial standing.

Employment, education affect divorce rates

Do half of all marriages actually end in divorce? The idea that 50 percent of marriages are doomed to fail is a popular myth circulated throughout the Internet and popular media in Oregon, but one researcher doubts that the divorce rate is actually that high. When breaking down divorce rates by gender and other factors, none of the percentages even passed a 45 percent divorce rate.

Employment, education affect divorce rates

Do half of all marriages actually end in divorce? The idea that 50 percent of marriages are doomed to fail is a popular myth circulated throughout the Internet and popular media in Oregon, but one researcher doubts that the divorce rate is actually that high. When breaking down divorce rates by gender and other factors, none of the percentages even passed a 45 percent divorce rate.