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One's age at the time of marriage could raise chance of divorce

Trends in divorce have changed and evolved over time as society has adapted to new and different societal norms. Although the average age of Americans at the time of marriage seems to have increased over the years, the scientifically backed "ideal" age to marry ends well before many people choose to actually tie the knot. So does this mean Oregon couples who put off marriage until later in life are destined to divorce?

According to researchers, getting married at age 32 or later causes the chance of divorce to rise. At age 33, the chance of divorce goes up another 5 percent, and the chance of divorce continues to increase with age. While older couples likely have more financial stability and education, waiting to marry until the early 30s could indicate some type of interpersonal relationship difficulty.

While the 32-year mark as a cut-off for lower divorce rates is a relatively new discovery, the chance of divorce for those married in their teens has stayed the same. Getting married too early actually increases the possibility of a divorce more than waiting until the early 30s. Couples in their teens and early 20s consistently deal with the highest rates of divorce.

Science might indicate that getting married in one's mid-to-late 20s is ideal, but, in reality, any couple who marries at any age may find themselves divorcing for a variety of reasons. Absent of extenuating circumstances, most divorcing couples in Oregon will face similar challenges, including property division, alimony and, if there are children, custody agreements. Once these issues have been addressed, either through mediation or before a judge, a divorce can successfully be settled with an agreement that benefits both parties.

Source: kfor.com, "Divorce rises for those who wed too early or too late. Perfect age to tie the knot?", Heather Holeman, Oct. 21, 2015

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