Leahy, Van Vactor, Cox & Melendy, LLP
Experienced Representation
You Can Trust Serving Oregon Since 1949
Local 541-357-9903 Toll Free 866-951-0032

In divorce, the best interests of the child are not always clear

Parents in Oregon usually agree that their children's best interests should be respected in almost all aspects of life, but what is that best interest, exactly? For each family going through a divorce, the answer will be different. It often requires a tailored and focused approach to determine the best interests of the child, even if his or her parents are divorcing for an otherwise seemingly common reason.

Unfortunately, parents are not always in agreement regarding their child's best interests. A common cause of custody disputes involves fathers attempting to establish rights to their children. Historically, giving full custody to mothers was considered to be in the best interests of virtually all children, but this is simply not true anymore. Fathers who are unable to achieve what they believe to be a necessary place in their children's lives do not have to fear going before a judge anymore. Many family law judges now agree with the evidence that supports healthy involvement from both parents.

Child custody disputes are not always the cause of concerned parents trying to exercise their parental rights. Sadly, some disputes arise from one parent attempting to use his or her child as a pawn in order to achieve specific terms in the settlement. Others do so in order to try to punish their soon-to-be ex-spouses. This type of dispute is usually difficult to resolve and often requires the intervention of the family law court.

Determining child custody is an overwhelming task for virtually all Oregon parents. This process can become even more complicated when parents are at odds regarding the best interests of the child involved. While parents have the option to reach an agreeable custody arrangement through mediation or mutual negotiations, they can also take the matter before a judge, who will take various factors into account before rendering a final decision.

Source: The Huffington Post, "Understanding Child Custody Disputes With Help From National Family Solutions", Mike Wood, Oct. 6, 2016

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information